Mesothelioma Awareness Day

mesothelioma awareness day

September 26 marks an important day in the lives of mesothelioma survivors, their families and caregivers, and those still in treatment; Mesothelioma Awareness Day.

Mesothelioma is an incurable cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. It is aggressive and deadly and has different types based on which part of a patient’s mesothelium is affected. Presently, there is no safe amount of asbestos to be exposed to and there is no cure for this disease which can take up to 20 years to develop in a person’s lungs or pleura.

This Thursday, many will take a moment to consider the impact this disease has had on their lives and the lives of their loved ones. Some have banded together to form groups to spread awareness of this horrible disease and provide information on how to prevent it for future generations while others still are working to make sure asbestos, the cause of mesothelioma itself, is not allowed back into the United States on construction sites or in automotive plants by signing petitions to be delivered to the EPA. No matter the course of action you choose to promote awareness, both are positive and informational in fighting the spread of this horrific disease. One such organization inviting individuals and their families to get involved is the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization. They are currently gathering signatures for a petition to present to the EPA to ban asbestos with no loopholes nor exemptions including children’s crayons and women’s makeup. ADAO’s petition can be found here: https://www.change.org/p/u-s-environmental-protection-agency-ban-asbestos-in-the-us-now-without-loopholes-or-exemptions.

There will be many events held on social media for users to meaningfully participate as well. A #ENDMeso Twitter Chat from 12 – 1 p.m. EST as well as infographics and a Facebook frame from the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation. Allowing users to share ideas and virtually show their support to others in their communities.

Many may also choose to wear “Meso Blue” shirts and wristbands on the day to begin conversations with those seeking knowledge about this vitally important topic. Or volunteering their time at local hospitals or hospice facilities to hear the stories of those suffering or to help the families who have lost a cherished member. We encourage readers to find ways to help in their own communities because all voices and efforts lent to this cause are tremendously helpful.

Thankfully, there are many ways to share information and gain information, no matter which arena you choose.

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